The Great Lego Spill

Container Ships

Our story starts in 1950. At a typical port, flour or clothing or raw cotton was packed in barrels, bags, or crates. Their next destination was a loading dock or a local warehouse.

Our Bottom Line: Externalities

Defined as the impact on an unrelated third party, an externality can be positive or negative. Because of scale, container ship externalities are countless. The largest cargo ships can carry 20,000 containers. That means one quarter billion containers annually travel among our ports. The upside includes minimal transport expense, easy transfer from boat to train and truck. But among the negative externalities, we can list the size of a catastrophe. With Lego, the plastics environmental devastation was cataclysmic. Combining the pandemic and these huge vessels led to magnified supply chain snarls and port pile ups. The good and the bad are bound to be big. Inevitably, we get a Great Lego Spill.

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Located at the intersection of current events, history, and economics, econlife® slices away all of the layers that make economics boring and complex.

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Econlife Team

Econlife Team

Located at the intersection of current events, history, and economics, econlife® slices away all of the layers that make economics boring and complex.